Venoscope II

The Venoscope® II transilluminator, The Vein Finder™, allows a clinician to easily locate hard to find veins, making it faster and more efficient for health care providers and clinicians to deliver a higher level of quality care. Fewer sticks means less time that a clinician needs to spend with each patient, reduces the waste of materials such as needles, syringes, PICC and midline trays, and makes the procedure safer and more comfortable for the patient.

Although in most cases a clinician can easily identify and access the veins of their patient's, there are those patients with hard to find veins, such as the obese, elderly and patients with dark skin. Data collected in hospital settings show that as a result of patients with hard to find veins, multiple sticks occur on twenty-five (25%) percent of patients. By using the Venoscope® II, a clinician can reduce multiple sticks and increase the first stick success rate toward the 100% mark.

The use of the Venoscope® II is a non-invasive procedure, and is done by placing the Venoscope® II on the surface of the skin of a patient in such a way that the high intensity light of Venoscope® II is projected into the subcutaneous tissue of a patient. The light causes the veins of a patient to contrast with the surrounding tissue, thereby making it easier to locate veins suitable for IV therapy and blood draws.

Features:

High Intensity, Dual Wavelength, LED Light Source
Three Position Rocker Switch (High - Off - Low)
Low Battery Indication Light
Uses 3 AA Alkaline Batteries

 

icon_pdfVenoscope II Inormation Brochure  icon_pdfVeonoscope II Usage Instructions


 

 


 

Forget blind, painful IV sticks.
Visualize that vein like you've never seen it before.
 
You will be surprised, amazed and delighted at the performance of the Venoscope® II. You will not believe your eyes when you first realize that the dark line between the dual arms is the vein.
 
The Venoscope® II is the most effective and versatile transilluminator for locating those hard to find veins in IV therapy or blood draws. Make those difficult needle sticks easier and faster for the clinician, and more comfortable and safer for the patient. This small, battery-operated transilluminator is easy to use, portable, and its lights are cool to the touch.
 
The Venoscope® II utilizes a revolutionary breakthrough in LED technology. With the help of the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, NASA, and its Technology Transfer Program, we have developed a device that uses the latest ultra bright LED (light emitting diode) technology to produce one of the best handheld transilluminators on the market today.
 
The patented dual arms of the Venoscope® II contain two white and one red LED. This particular combination of lights, with different wavelengths, allows the light to penetrate deeper into the subcutaneous tissue and to create the contrast necessary so that the blood veins stand out as dark lines within the illuminated orange tissue.

 


"First Stick Confidence!"
 
The Only Backup Plan You'll Need.
 
Let's face it, no matter how skilled you are, there's been a time when you've had difficulty finding a vein. Not only is it time consuming and expensive to have to call for backup, it can also result in a distressed patient and family members. With the help of the Venoscope® II and its high-intensity LED lights you'll be sure to find the vein the first time, guaranteeing patient satisfaction and comfort. It's a reliable backup plan that's always within reach. And that's sure to keep your patient at ease, make you more efficient and definitely more welcome in their home.
 
"I highly recommend that every homecare nurse have a new Venoscope® II. It will give them that first stick confidence to tackle even the most difficult patient. Best of all, the light is very affordable for nurses to purchase for themselves. At $150.00 it costs less than a good stethoscope and it will make your life easier."
 
Virginia Watson, RN
Homecare Nurse
Covington, LA

 


Need a quick IV? Don't waste time - visualize the veins that you only thought were there!
 
The Venoscope® was invented by a paramedic in order to provide a fast, safe and efficient method of starting IVs in the most difficult of situations. The paramedic noted that when a bright light was placed on the surface of the skin it was possible to see a faint outline of a peripheral vein. He worked with the local university's technology assistance program to develop a device with fiberoptic light guides and dual arms to bracket the vein. Today, the new Venoscope® II takes the technology a giant leap forward by using high intensity LED lights in varying wavelengths to produce the brightest light possible for transillumination.
 
This new NASA inspired technology has resulted in an extremely portable, light weight device that is a must for every paramedic in the field. It is invaluable in those dark of night emergencies where an IV is crucial in saving a life. Auto accidents and other emergencies, where availability of lighting is compromised or non-existent, are easily handled with the Venoscope® II. It can be used to locate peripheral veins for IV starts and it can be used as a regular flashlight as needed.
 
The Venoscope® II uses 3 AA alkaline batteries and it has an LED indicator which indicates that the batteries need to be changed. The batteries will last for 12-14 hours when left on continuously. The LED lights are rated at more than 5,000 hours, so you will probably never burn it out.
 
Increasingly, paramedics are called on to start IVs in the home setting. Difficult sticks on frail, obese, dark skinned individuals do not present a problem when using the Venoscope® II. It even works exceptionally well on neonates and children.


"I have been using the Venoscope®, Model VSK1001, for the past five years and it has proven to be invaluable in imaging deep reticular veins, even beneath matted spider veins, for sclerotherapy treatment. I also use it to mark veins pre-operatively for ambulatory stab avulsion phlebectomy procedures, and I occasionally use it intra-operatively. I have tested the new Venoscope® II with its LED light array and find it to be even more effective than the previous version. I consider the Venoscope® II to be a "must have" device for every physician practicing sclerotherapy or ambulatory phlebectomy. It makes the procedures easier, quicker and more effective.
 
Thank you most kindly for the opportunity to test the new model and I commend you for your contributions to improving the quality of care for patients with venous disease."
 
James C. Ingram, Jr., MD, FACS
Director, Vein Centers of Louisiana
Lafayette, LA
 

 "I’ve used the Venoscope® for 18 months in my practice of phlebology. I couldn’t imagine practicing without this ingenious device. Matting? Blushing? Good luck treating these nuisances without a Venoscope®! This handy light resides in my coat pocket. I can pull it out anytime to unravel the feeding system of complex telangiectasia. I can map out many complex systems without resorting to a duplex.
 
I am very excited about the new Venoscope® II. During my test of the prototype, I found it to be much more powerful without the need for dimming the lights. And the cost of the unit, around $150, is incredibly inexpensive for any tool that will prove to be used not daily but, rather, hourly by anyone in the practice of phlebology (not to mention its usefulness an IV technician or a paediatric nurse on the hunt of the all-to-common elusive intravenous access).
 
Congratulations on a fine product that will be a "sell-out", and please reserve three of them for me."
 
Sanford J. Greenberg, MD
Medical Director, The Vein Doctor
Palm Desert, CA
 

"I wanted to express my appreciation for the opportunity to use the new Venoscope ® II as it is the most user friendly transillumination device I have used to date. The placement of the LED lights on the handpiece appears to be optimal for excellent visualization of reticular and superficial varicose veins on our patient’s legs and at other sites. This new device appears to be a significant technological improvement for convenient, easily portable transillumination of our patients’ veins as it applies to injection compression sclerotherapy and ambulatory phlebectomy.
 
Thank you for providing a greatly improved transilluminator."
 
Rick K. Wilson, M.D.
Member of American College of Phlebology
Plano Dermatology
 
 "The Venoscope® has become an indispensable tool in my phlebology practice. (I have two, just in case one breaks down). I held on to the original version until it pretty much fell apart. The Venoscope® II entered my life just in time. It is surprisingly lightweight and even more powerful than the original. It even serves as an effective marketing tool. When patients clearly see the offending reticular vein feeding their telangiectasias, their confidence level in me goes up. The Venoscope® allows almost 100% vein entry and allows accurate assessment of extent and completeness of treatment. No other device comes close.
 
Dr. Wayne Gradman
Los Angeles, CA

 


Transillumination Mapping Prior to Ambulatory Phlebectomy
 
Robert A. Weiss, MD
Mitchel P. Goldman, MD
 
BACKGROUND.
Ambulatory phlebectomy (AP) for removal of varicose and reticular veins has become a very popular and widely used in-office outpatient technique over the past decade. One of the major obstacles of this or any other surgical vein removal technique is the technical difficulty presented to the surgeon by the disappearance of the veins to be removed when the patient is positioned horizontally on an operative table. Preoperative marking is therefore essential.
 
OBJECTIVE.
To investigate whether use of transillumination would facilitate and enhance marking of varicose veins prior to AP, we performed a study in which both traditional marking with the patient standing and transillumination marking with the patient horizontal were performed sequentially.
 
METHODS.
One hundred patients were sequentially examined prior to AP. The veins to be removed were mapped by the traditional way utilizing visual inspection and palpation in a standing position. They were then mapped in the supine or prone position utilizing a transillumination device specifically designed to enhance visualization of veins prior to venipuncture.
 
RESULTS.
In 100 out of 100 patients the markings performed using transillumination mapping most closely correlated with actual vein position during surgery. In addition, transillumination allowed for gauging of vein depth.
 
CONCLUSIONS.
Transillumination mapping significantly enhances the technique of ambulatory phlebectomy by more accurately visualizing the course of a varicose vein prior to extraction. Furthermore, sites for incisions or punctures are more accurately guided. As a result of this experience, it is now our routine practice to perform preoperative mapping for AP by transillumination in the horizontal position.
 
1998 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Dermatol Surg 1998:24-447-450.
 
 
Los Angeles, CA

 


Haemophilia is a disease that knows no boundaries!
 
It affects infants and adults alike. Learning to perform IV injections is a necessary and critical skill. The new Venoscope® II can help. The new device allows the average person, professional or not, to effectively locate and evaluate multiple IV sites for future IV access. It will give the family the luxury of mobility in travelling and recreation that they would normally be very reluctant to pursue for fear of being unable to administer factor in case of an emergency while away from home. Some factor providers have taken the position that by providing a Venoscope® II to their clients, they enhance the quality of life for the whole family. At $175.00, that is a small price to pay for peace of mind in knowing that you can access a vein in an emergency. Tell your factor supplier that you would like to have the Venoscope® II.
 
The Venoscope® II was developed by a paramedic to aid in locating and evaluating peripheral veins for IV therapy and blood draws. The basic idea is "if you can see it, you can stick it". The new Venoscope® II transilluminator does this by directing a very bright light into the subcutaneous tissue so that it produces an orange glow when the external room lights are dimmed. When the light passes over a vein, the vein absorbs the light and the vein shows up as a dark line between the dual arms of the light. You can verify that it is in fact a suitable vein by depressing the arms and observing the vein collapse and refill when you release the pressure. We call this blanching the vein. If it does not blanch, it is not a suitable vein. It may even be a tendon which you definitely do not want to stick. At this point, you may mark the "target vein" and proceed with the stick or simply reverse the light with the vein located between the arms and proceed with the stick between the arms. You can ask someone to hold the light or simply tape it to the site while you perform the stick.

 


Carolyn Baratta Yucha, RN, PhD, Paul Russ, MD, Sharon Baker, RN, MS
 
This research evaluates the Venoscope® for its ability to detect infiltrations when present (sensitivity) and to detect the absence of infiltrations when not present (specificity), and compares these findings with those obtained via ultrasonography. Healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to receive or not receive an intentionally made 5-ml normal-saline infiltration. The Venoscope® had a sensitivity of .92-.93 and a specificity of .89-1.0. Ultrasound had a sensitivity of .92-.93 and a specificity of .22-.25. The Venoscope®, which is simple and easy to use, is a valid indicator of the presence and absence of IV infiltrations.
 
DISCUSSION
Under the conditions studied, the Venoscope® was able to accurately detect the presence of an infiltration 92% of the time and to accurately detect the absence of an infiltration 80-100% of the time. These findings suggest that a valid use of the Venoscope® is the detection of IV infiltrations. In this study, the Venoscope® was able to detect infiltrations made with 5 ml of normal saline, 20 minutes postinfiltration. It is expected that the Venoscope® would perform better when using it to examine an IV site in the process of infiltrating or immediately after infiltration has occurred. Venoscope® examination is simple, it requires approximately 10 seconds to complete, and it can be performed readily at the bedside.
 
Although the ultrasound performed similarly with regard to detection of IV infiltrations (sensitivity), it was not able to detect lack of infiltration (specificity) as well as the Venoscope®. Because of logistics involved in data collection, ultrasound examination occurred approximately 40 minutes after infiltration/injection. Although it may have performed better had the examinations occurred earlier, this time change may have made no difference because diagnosis of infiltration was based on position of the cannula in relation to the vein, and this position was not expected to change over the time period studied. More importantly perhaps, ultrasound examination requires expensive equipment and extensive training; therefore, it is not cost-effective as a tool to examine IV sites on a routine basis.
 
Although IV infiltrations occur frequently, most do not cause any serious tissue damage. At the minimum, IV infiltrations cause patient discomfort and require re-insertion of an IV cannula elsewhere, which consumes nursing time and increases the cost of supplies. Alternatively, solutions containing calcium, potassium, antibiotics, vasoconstrictors, or chemotherapeutic agents are known to cause marked tissue damage. Early detection of infiltrations of these solutions may prevent nerve damage and/or tissue sloughing, which necessitates skin grafting and potential litigation. Use of the Venoscope® in routine hourly IV checks could allow the nurse to detect infiltrations earlier, thereby minimizing the amount of solution extravasated and subsequent tissue damage.
 
The RA using the Venoscope® to evaluate the IV sites had been examining IV sites in hospitalized patients intermittently during a 1-year period. It is unknown how much experience a nurse should have with the Venoscope® to detect infiltrations with the sensitivity and specificity reported here. In addition, this study evaluated the performance of the Venoscope® in young adults. Although its reliability and validity in infants, children, or older adults is unknown, it is likely that it would be easier to detect infiltrations in these subjects because they generally have less subcutaneous tissue than young adults. Lastly, this study does not evaluate the performance of the Venoscope® in ill patients who have IVs. However, there is no reason to believe that its performance would be altered in ill patients.
 
Carolyn B. Yucha, RN, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Health Science Center School of Nursing in Denver, Colorado, where she teaches Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology. Sharon Baker is a Clinical Nurse Educator at University Hospital in Denver, Colorado. Paul Russ is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology at the University of Colorado Health Science Center in Denver, Colorado.
 
JOURNAL OF INTRAVENOUS NURSING
 
Vol. 20, No. 1 January/February 1997

 


How does the light work?

The new Venoscope® II transilluminator works by directing a high intensity light down into the subcutaneous tissue and creating a uniform area of orangish reflection of the fatty tissue. The light is flush with the skin and by moving it around the extremity you will be able to see a dark line between the two arms when you come across a vein.. The dark line is the vein. The vein's deoxygenated blood absorbs the light whereas the fatty tissue reflects the light.
 

How do I know that the dark line is a vein and not a tendon?

After you have located the dark line you can easily tell if it is a vein and also if it is soft and patent or sclerotic. All you have to do is simply depress both arms of the light on either side of the dark line. If the line disappears and then reappears when you release the pressure, it is a vein that is capable of transmitting fluids and medications. If the dark line does not "blanch", disappear and reappear, it is not a vein and you should not stick it. This could result in serious complications for the patient and the practitioner.
 

Is the Venoscope® II easy to use?

The Venoscope® II is light, weighing less than 7 ounces, and it is extremely portable. You prep the patient, tourniquet etc., and then dim the room lights in order for the light to perform best. The room does not have to be pitch dark and you can gradually increase the ambient lighting as you become more comfortable with the presentation of the vein.
 
Once you have located and evaluated the vein, you can mark it with a surgical marking pen or some other method of targeting the vein. Then you can increase the ambient lighting and proceed as you would normally to cannulate the vein. If you prefer, you can reverse the Venoscope® II and attach it to the patient's arm with tape and proceed to cannulate the target vein between the two arms with the light attached.
 

Why do I need it, I am very good at starting IVs?

We have asked hundreds if not thousands of nurses if they felt they would/could use the Venoscope® transilluminator. Most stated that they in fact have had difficult patients where the use of the Venoscope® would have made life easier for them and their patients. The question then becomes: Why not have a Venoscope® available for those difficult sticks? If the Venoscope® can reduce the number of sticks and improve the whole experience, why not use it for the benefit of all concerned. Clearly, blind sticks are seldom successful and can result in serious complications, even legal proceedings. There is no reason not to have one for your peace of mind in knowing that you have the ability to improve your first stick IV success rate.
 

Does the room have to be pitch dark?

No it doesn’t but the darker the better especially when you are learning how to use the light. As you become more familiar with the depiction of the veins you will find that you can locate veins in more lighted conditions.
 

How do I clean the light?

You can use alcohol or bleach solution but do not submerge the light.
 

What are the Disposable Protective Covers used for?

The Disposable Protective Covers are CLEAN and not sterile. They are used on high risk patients where you do not want fluids contaminating the light.
 

The light has two intensity settings, hi and low, which one should I use?

You will generally use the higher setting on all patients. The low setting works better sometimes to bring the vein into sharper focus. The low setting is also for small neonates where the high setting seems to blow through the tiny arm.
 

I have done everything and I still don’t see any veins, what should I do?

If you tried in a dark room and were unable to find anything, then you can either perform a blind stick or suggest a cut down procedure. Obviously there are no veins available.
 

Does it work on obese patients?

Obese patients are a special challenge. Generally they are sedentary and their small venous network is obscured by the fatty tissue. On these patients you will do best to go for veins on the back pad of the hand. However, every patient is different, and you may be delighted to find great veins with the light.
 

How does it work on dark skinned patients?

It works like magic on all but the very darkest skin. On the darker skin the area of illumination is greatly reduced and you will be concentrating on the small illuminated area between the arms. You verify the vein by pressing down and releasing as usual.
 

How do I use the light to check for infiltration?

You can check for infiltration with a simple scan with the Venoscope®. You located the dark line, verified it and started the IV. If you look again at the vein with the catheter in place and do not see the dark line you can expect infiltration. The fluid has infiltrated into the interstitial tissue and all you see is the glow from the reflecting tissue and fluid and no vein.
 

What do the patients think about the Venoscope®?

Most think it a novel approach to locating veins and they are ecstatic when the nurse shows them their vein. When the IV is started with one stick they are very happy and generally ask "Why didn’t you use it before now?". Rest assured, they will tell their doctor and friends about the new Venoscope® and how it helped reduce their discomfort.
 

This looks complicated, how long does it take?

The first few times that you use the light will take the longest, probably less than 10 minutes to do the assessment. Once you "see the picture" you should be able to assess a patient in a few minutes because you can easily recognize the good veins.
 

The light feels warm after being on for a few minutes. Will it burn the patients?

NO, the light temperature has been measured at 95 degree F, below body temperature, after 15 minutes continuous on.
 

Is the Venoscope® II TGA/FDA approved?

Yes, the Venoscope® has FDA and TGA approval.
 

How do I know when to change the batteries?

The red LED on top of the switch will illuminate each time you turn the light on. It will check the circuitry and then go out if the batteries are good. When the red LED stays on, it is time to change the 3 AA alkaline batteries. New batteries should last 10-12 hours continuous on and many hours in normal use.
 

If the bulbs burn out, who do I call?

The bulbs are rated in excess of 5,000 hours, however, some fail early. The Venoscope® is sealed and the bulbs cannot be changed. If it fails within one year from purchase, simply call us and we will replace it with a new one at no cost to you.
 

Other departments within the hospital want a Venoscope®, who do I tell them to call?

All ordering information is available on our web site www.users.bigpond.com/graykon. For direct link to ordering information click on this link
 

 
Thank you for using the new Venoscope® II. Above all, have fun with the Venoscope®. Engage the patients and show them how easy it is to find good veins. Their anxiety level will decrease and they will become involved in the procedure rather than just sit and bear the pain.


Transillumination Mapping Prior to Ambulatory Phlebectomy
 
Robert A. Weiss, MD
Mitchel P. Goldman, MD
 
BACKGROUND.
Ambulatory phlebectomy (AP) for removal of varicose and reticular veins has become a very popular and widely used in-office outpatient technique over the past decade. One of the major obstacles of this or any other surgical vein removal technique is the technical difficulty presented to the surgeon by the disappearance of the veins to be removed when the patient is positioned horizontally on an operative table. Preoperative marking is therefore essential.
 
OBJECTIVE.
To investigate whether use of transillumination would facilitate and enhance marking of varicose veins prior to AP, we performed a study in which both traditional marking with the patient standing and transillumination marking with the patient horizontal were performed sequentially.
 
METHODS.
One hundred patients were sequentially examined prior to AP. The veins to be removed were mapped by the traditional way utilizing visual inspection and palpation in a standing position. They were then mapped in the supine or prone position utilizing a transillumination device specifically designed to enhance visualization of veins prior to venipuncture.
 
RESULTS.
In 100 out of 100 patients the markings performed using transillumination mapping most closely correlated with actual vein position during surgery. In addition, transillumination allowed for gauging of vein depth.
 
CONCLUSIONS.
Transillumination mapping significantly enhances the technique of ambulatory phlebectomy by more accurately visualizing the course of a varicose vein prior to extraction. Furthermore, sites for incisions or punctures are more accurately guided. As a result of this experience, it is now our routine practice to perform preoperative mapping for AP by transillumination in the horizontal position.
 
1998 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Dermatol Surg 1998:24-447-450.
 
 
Los Angeles, CA

Detecting IV Infiltrations Using a Venoscope®
 
Carolyn Baratta Yucha, RN, PhD, Paul Russ, MD, Sharon Baker, RN, MS
 
This research evaluates the Venoscope® for its ability to detect infiltrations when present (sensitivity) and to detect the absence of infiltrations when not present (specificity), and compares these findings with those obtained via ultrasonography. Healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to receive or not receive an intentionally made 5-ml normal-saline infiltration. The Venoscope® had a sensitivity of .92-.93 and a specificity of .89-1.0. Ultrasound had a sensitivity of .92-.93 and a specificity of .22-.25. The Venoscope®, which is simple and easy to use, is a valid indicator of the presence and absence of IV infiltrations.
 
DISCUSSION
Under the conditions studied, the Venoscope® was able to accurately detect the presence of an infiltration 92% of the time and to accurately detect the absence of an infiltration 80-100% of the time. These findings suggest that a valid use of the Venoscope® is the detection of IV infiltrations. In this study, the Venoscope® was able to detect infiltrations made with 5 ml of normal saline, 20 minutes postinfiltration. It is expected that the Venoscope® would perform better when using it to examine an IV site in the process of infiltrating or immediately after infiltration has occurred. Venoscope® examination is simple, it requires approximately 10 seconds to complete, and it can be performed readily at the bedside.
 
Although the ultrasound performed similarly with regard to detection of IV infiltrations (sensitivity), it was not able to detect lack of infiltration (specificity) as well as the Venoscope®. Because of logistics involved in data collection, ultrasound examination occurred approximately 40 minutes after infiltration/injection. Although it may have performed better had the examinations occurred earlier, this time change may have made no difference because diagnosis of infiltration was based on position of the cannula in relation to the vein, and this position was not expected to change over the time period studied. More importantly perhaps, ultrasound examination requires expensive equipment and extensive training; therefore, it is not cost-effective as a tool to examine IV sites on a routine basis.
 
Although IV infiltrations occur frequently, most do not cause any serious tissue damage. At the minimum, IV infiltrations cause patient discomfort and require re-insertion of an IV cannula elsewhere, which consumes nursing time and increases the cost of supplies. Alternatively, solutions containing calcium, potassium, antibiotics, vasoconstrictors, or chemotherapeutic agents are known to cause marked tissue damage. Early detection of infiltrations of these solutions may prevent nerve damage and/or tissue sloughing, which necessitates skin grafting and potential litigation. Use of the Venoscope® in routine hourly IV checks could allow the nurse to detect infiltrations earlier, thereby minimizing the amount of solution extravasated and subsequent tissue damage.
 
The RA using the Venoscope® to evaluate the IV sites had been examining IV sites in hospitalized patients intermittently during a 1-year period. It is unknown how much experience a nurse should have with the Venoscope® to detect infiltrations with the sensitivity and specificity reported here. In addition, this study evaluated the performance of the Venoscope® in young adults. Although its reliability and validity in infants, children, or older adults is unknown, it is likely that it would be easier to detect infiltrations in these subjects because they generally have less subcutaneous tissue than young adults. Lastly, this study does not evaluate the performance of the Venoscope® in ill patients who have IVs. However, there is no reason to believe that its performance would be altered in ill patients.
 
Carolyn B. Yucha, RN, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Health Science Center School of Nursing in Denver, Colorado, where she teaches Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology. Sharon Baker is a Clinical Nurse Educator at University Hospital in Denver, Colorado. Paul Russ is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology at the University of Colorado Health Science Center in Denver, Colorado.
 
JOURNAL OF INTRAVENOUS NURSING
 
Vol. 20, No. 1 January/February 1997


"I wanted to thank you for this wonderful product. I work in a small facility that does not have IV teams or a lot of nurses around at any given time to attempt hard IV sticks. I am an ER nurse who has used this product for a little over a year and have used too many times to count. Our ancillary departments use it as well such as the Lab, Med-Surg unit, and radiology.

We have had ER physicians from other hospitals who have seen us use this and upon returning to there facility recommended they get one. I would recommend the VENOSCOPE ll to anyone!!!
 
Thanks Again,"
Angela Murrell LPN, ER
Pershing Memorial Hospital
 

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"I have been using your Venoscope II for 3 months now, and I just wanted to let you know how happy I am with it. It works every bit as well as scopes costing 5 times as much. Thanks for a great product."
 
Alex Denes, MD
Hemet, CA
 

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"I have been using the Venoscope, Model VSK1001, for the past five years and it has proven to be invaluable in imaging deep reticular veins, even beneath matted spider veins, for sclerotherapy treatment. I also use it to mark veins pre-operatively for ambulatory stab avulsion phlebectomy procedures, and I occasionally use it intra-operatively. I have tested the new Venoscope II with its LED light array and find it to be even more effective than the previous version. I consider the Venoscope II to be a "must have" device for every physician practicing sclerotherapy or ambulatory phlebectomy. It makes the procedures easier, quicker and more effective.
 
Thank you most kindly for the opportunity to test the new model and I commend you for your contributions to improving the quality of care for patients with venous disease."
 
James C. Ingram, Jr., MD, FACS
Director, Vein Centers of Louisiana
Lafayette, LA
 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"The Venoscope has become an indispensable tool in my phlebology practice. (I have two, just in case one breaks down). I held on to the original version until it pretty much fell apart. The Venoscope II entered my life just in time. It is surprisingly lightweight and even more powerful than the original. It even serves as an effective marketing tool. When patients clearly see the offending reticular vein feeding their telangiectasias, their confidence level in me goes up. The Venoscope allows almost 100% vein entry and allows accurate assessment of extent and completeness of treatment. No other device comes close.
 
Dr. Wayne Gradman
Los Angeles, CA
 

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"The new Venoscope II is awesome. It is light weight, easy to use and shows beautiful images under every circumstance we have used it.
 
Following ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy we treat reticular veins and spider veins. The Venoscope II is the most successful tool I have ever used in helping me delineate reticular veins for treatment. When I teach my Workshops and give preceptorships I will definitely recommend the use of the Venoscope II and demonstrate its function. I can’t imagine any office doing even the simplest type of sclerotherapy doing the work without the Venoscope II.
 
Thank you very much for letting us use this. I will use it daily."
 
Thomas J. Sims, MD
Physician and Surgeon
 

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To Whom It May Concern:
 
"The Venoscope’s recent advancements have produced a brilliant portable light source to transilluminate for Venous and Arterial access in preterm and term newborns. The light is also handy for transillumination of the chest and head. We have used various other light sources for similar applications, but these are cumbersome, bulky, and difficult to stabilize. The new Venoscope II is small and easy to use. It will prove to be an invaluable and "must have" device for the NICU."
 
Jim G. Adams, D.O.
Lafayette, LA
 

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"I’ve used the Venoscope for 18 months in my practice of phlebology. I couldn’t imagine practicing without this ingenious device. Matting? Blushing? Good luck treating these nuisances without a Venoscope! This handy light resides in my coat pocket. I can pull it out anytime to unravel the feeding system of complex telangiectasia. I can map out many complex systems without resorting to a duplex.
 
I am very excited about the new Venoscope II. During my test of the prototype, I found it to be much more powerful without the need for dimming the lights. And the cost of the unit, is incredibly inexpensive for any tool that will prove to be used not daily but, rather, hourly by anyone in the practice of phlebology (not to mention its usefulness an IV technician or a paediatric nurse on the hunt of the all-to-common elusive intravenous access).
 
Congratulations on a fine product that will be a "sell-out", and please reserve three of them for me."
 
Sanford J. Greenberg, MD
Medical Director, The Vein Doctor
Palm Desert, CA
 

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"I wanted to express my appreciation for the opportunity to use the new Venoscope II as it is the most user friendly transillumination device I have used to date. The placement of the LED lights on the handpiece appears to be optimal for excellent visualization of reticular and superficial varicose veins on our patient’s legs and at other sites. This new device appears to be a significant technological improvement for convenient, easily portable transillumination of our patients’ veins as it applies to injection compression sclerotherapy and ambulatory phlebectomy.
 
Thank you for providing a greatly improved transilluminator."
 
Rick K. Wilson, M.D.
Member of American College of Phlebology
Plano Dermatology
 

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"First stick confidence"
 
"I have been using the Venoscope transilluminator for the past 6 years in my role as a homecare nurse. I use it as my "field backup" for those frequent difficult sticks. It has allowed me to locate and cannulate veins that were invisible without the Venoscope. Patients request me repeatedly because the Venoscope means fewer sticks and less discomfort.
 
The new Venoscope II is a wonderful technological advancement over the old light. It is brighter, lighter, smaller and uses 3 AA alkaline batteries which I can change myself. The little red indicator tells me when I need to change batteries.
 
I highly recommend that every homecare nurse have a new Venoscope II. It will give them that first stick confidence to tackle even the most difficult patient. Best of all, the light is very affordable for nurses to purchase for themselves.
 
Virginia Watson, RN
Homecare Nurse
Covington, LA
 

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"I just wanted to drop you folks a line to let you know how much I appreciate the new Venoscope II. I am an RN at a busy county hospital. I start between 10-20 peripheral IVs a week. I have worked at this facility for 31 years. The new Venoscope II has made my job much easier. I started with the original Landry vein light and then the Venoscope. The latest model is easy to use and convenient to keep with me during my work day. I recommend the light to any nurse who starts IVs. It is guaranteed to upgrade their skills with a little practice. Keep up the good work..."
 
Alan Redick, RN.
Contra Costa Regional Medical Center
Martinez, CA.
 

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"I have been using the Venoscope II since May 2002. As a Nuclear Medicine Technologist in the Radiology Department at Henry Ford Hospital, I inject a wide spectrum of patients, who, for various reasons, occasionally have veins that are difficult to access. These patients are pleased, as am I , that I have a "magic light" that reveals (and makes accessible), their hidden veins, thus minimizing their discomfort and allowing their exams to be started in a timely manner. This is a tool that enhances my skills and affords greater patient satisfaction."
 
Thomas Fletcher
Henry Ford Hospital

 

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